Colorado

  • March 01, 2024

    Gov't Wants Spectrum Fraud Case Against Dish Dismissed

    The Justice Department has decided to intervene in a suit accusing Dish Network of using sham companies to buy spectrum from the Federal Communications Commission at a $3.3 billion discount, but not to take over litigation of the matter — it wants to end the whole thing.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC Backs Colo. Right-To-Repair Expansion

    A Federal Trade Commission representative appeared at a Colorado legislative hearing in support of a proposed "right-to-repair" law requiring manufacturers to provide documentation, software, data and certain tools to allow consumers to fix their own digital electronic equipment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Real Estate Brokerage Settles Data Breach Class Claims

    A proposed class settled a data breach lawsuit against a Denver-based real estate brokerage and property management company in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Trucking Co. Seeks Early Win In Colo. Drivers' OT Suit

    A trucking company has asked a Colorado federal judge to grant it a win in a group of drivers' lawsuit alleging unpaid overtime, arguing that the workers can't prove the statute of limitations should be extended to cover their claims.

  • February 29, 2024

    Veil Shouldn't Be Pierced To Decode Contracts, Panel Says

    The doctrine of piercing the corporate veil shouldn't be used to interpret disputed contract terms, a split Colorado appellate panel ruled Thursday, reversing a trial court's award of more than $600,000 in a real estate fight between two longtime friends.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Revives Wound Center's Damages Suit

    A Colorado state appellate panel Thursday revived a wound center's lawsuit against a rural healthcare district for payments related to its agreement with the district, finding in a published opinion that there were factual disputes a trial court failed to address in dismissing the wound center's breach of contract claims.

  • February 29, 2024

    Iowa State Athletes Cry Foul On State's Betting Dragnet

    Current and former Iowa State University athletes are looking to unwind the charges against them in the state's sports betting dragnet, asserting that investigators compiled evidence against them through illegal search and seizure.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Says Well Owners' Appeal Belongs In Water Court

    Two Colorado well owners can't bring a county district court lawsuit challenging a well permitting decision by the state water engineer because those issues are "water matters" that belong in a special water court, an appellate panel ruled Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Firm Says Atty Abandoned Work While Seeking New Job

    A Denver debt collection law firm has accused a former senior associate of performing little to no meaningful work during a brief one-year tenure at the outfit while also pursuing a partnership role at another firm.

  • February 29, 2024

    10th Circ. Says NLRB's Remedies 'Inconsistent' With Law

    The National Labor Relations Board surpassed its powers when ordering a concrete company to make pension contributions and profit-sharing payments to workers without factoring in past compensation, the Tenth Circuit ruled, sending the case back to the board for a second look but finding the company violated federal labor law.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. House OKs Multistate Online Insurance Tax Filing

    Colorado would require insurance companies to pay certain taxes through a multistate third-party online application approved by the state Division of Insurance under legislation passed by the state House of Representatives.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Asks When Feds Will Consider Climate In Oil Leases

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday voiced frustration at the Bureau of Land Management's inability to account for the total impact of carbon emissions from six western oil and gas leases, but cautioned that previous circuit courts have upheld federal agencies' reluctance to block projects based on climate change predictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    Drilling Services Co. Must Face Suit Over Worker's Injury

    A company that provides power to oil drilling operations must face an indemnification lawsuit after a worker was electrocuted while fixing a downed line, according to a Colorado federal judge's order finding that the case wouldn't interfere with the worker's injury suit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Green Groups Pan Colorado's Monitoring Deal With Suncor

    A group of environmental advocacy organizations told a Colorado state judge that state environmental regulators and Suncor Energy gave them too little time to review a settlement about enforcement of air quality monitoring regulations, but said they saw enough to spot some concerning flaws.

  • February 28, 2024

    Suit Blames Father-Son Mismanagement For Pot Co. Collapse

    A member of a Colorado cannabis cultivation and dispensary business is asking a state district court to appoint a receiver over the company, saying a father and son involved have mismanaged the company by buying unlicensed cannabis plants and failing to prepare a processing facility.

  • February 28, 2024

    Utah, Okla.'s EPA Ozone Challenge Sent To DC Circ.

    The Tenth Circuit slingshotted seven consolidated challenges to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision disapproving Utah and Oklahoma's air quality plans to the D.C. Circuit, finding the Clean Air Act requires the disputes to fall under D.C. Circuit jurisdiction given the decision's national scope.

  • February 28, 2024

    Oil Co. Says It's Too Broke For Colo. Regulators' $130M Bond

    An oil and gas production company is asking a Colorado state judge to stay regulators' "exorbitant" order requiring it to pay $130 million in financial assurance on its obligation to plug and remediate oil and gas wells, arguing the company doesn't even have the cash for a $13 million installment due this month.

  • February 27, 2024

    $11M Meat Co. Deals Get Early OK In Colo. Wage Fixing Suit

    A Colorado federal judge Tuesday gave initial approval to class settlements with two meat producers and a consulting company, requiring $11.25 million in payments to resolve claims that they participated in a nationwide scheme to fix and depress wages for meat plant workers.

  • February 27, 2024

    Colo. Wants Immediate End To Sick Leave Law Challenge

    The state of Colorado called on a federal court to immediately dismiss an airline lobbying group's challenge to a state sick leave law, arguing that recent precedent established that the law was not preempted by the Airline Deregulation Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Anesthesia Group Settles Colo. AG's Monopoly Claims

    U.S. Anesthesia Partners has said it would cede control of deals with several Colorado hospitals and pay $200,000 in legal fees to settle the state attorney general's allegations that the practice group had anti-competitive control of the market. 

  • February 27, 2024

    Judge Says Coffee Co.'s IP Claims Need More Time To Brew

    A Colorado federal judge on Tuesday rejected competing efforts to avoid trial in a cold brew equipment maker's infringement suit against an insulated mug company, with the judge finding it's too soon for her to rule on the merits of the case.

  • February 27, 2024

    Colo. Lawmakers OK Local-Option Property Tax Credits

    Local governments in Colorado would be authorized to grant property tax incentives to address local shortcomings related to the usage of real property under legislation approved Tuesday by the General Assembly.

  • February 26, 2024

    Albright Pauses DOE's Crypto Mining Survey, For Now

    A Texas federal judge has temporarily barred the U.S. Department of Energy from requiring crypto mining firms to provide data on their electricity usage after a lawsuit from a Texas industry group and a bitcoin mining firm accused the government of skirting the process to approve the survey.

  • February 26, 2024

    Western Union Sued For Interest It Earns On Failed Transfers

    Financial services company Western Union has been hit with a proposed class action alleging that the company can't lawfully earn interest from money transfers that don't make it to their recipient.

  • February 26, 2024

    Colo. Workers Say United Jumped Gun On OT Exemption

    Employees of a United Airlines subsidiary who cleaned aircraft in Colorado airports were denied time-and-a-half overtime pay when they voluntarily picked up colleagues' shifts, two workers have alleged in a proposed class action filed in Colorado federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • Perspectives

    'True Threat' Ruling May Ensnare Kids' Online Speech

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Counterman v. Colorado decision correctly held that a showing of intent is required to prosecute someone for true threats, but the amorphous standard adopted by the court risks overcriminalizing children’s use of social media and text-based communications, say Adam Pollet at Eversheds Sutherland and Suzanne La Pierre at Human Rights for Kids.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • How Rate Exportation Is Shifting Amid Regulatory Trends

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    All banks and their partners, including fintechs, that wish to lend to borrowers in multiple states and charge uniform interest rates should heed regulatory developments across the country and determine how best to mitigate risks in their efforts to offer credit to consumers on a nationwide basis, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Opinion

    10th Circ. Remand Of ERISA Claims To Insurer Is Problematic

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    The Tenth Circuit recently gave the defendant another bite at the apple in David P. v. United Healthcare by remanding Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims for reprocessing, but the statute lacks any provision authorizing remands of ERISA cases, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Why Employers Should Heed High Court Web Designer Ruling

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    While not an employment law ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in the First Amendment case 303 Creative v. Elenis raises serious questions for employers that constitute public accommodations and have related anti-discrimination policies, says Tanner Camp at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Barbie Deals Should Remind Brands Of IP Licensing Benefits

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    Mattel Inc.'s recent licensing of the Barbie trademark — one of the biggest licensing campaigns of recent history — illustrates that, as long as risks are managed properly, intellectual property licensing can form part of the overall business strategy and benefit both parties, say Maria Peyman and Anousha Vasantha at Birketts.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Can Class Actions Guide AI Risk Mitigation Efforts?

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    The speed at which artificial intelligence is developing will likely outpace the legislative response, and two recently filed class actions naming OpenAI as a defendant raise the question of whether existing laws may be used to place some meaningful guardrails on the development of AI, says Thomas Carey at Sunstein.

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