Government Contracts

  • March 18, 2024

    Judge Pauses Fla. Tribe's Suit Over Clean Water Act Program

    A Florida federal judge on Monday paused a lawsuit brought by the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians alleging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency improperly granted the state permitting authority under a Clean Water Act program, saying the case could be moot if an order in similar litigation is allowed to stand.

  • March 18, 2024

    High Court Doubts Feds Coerced Social Media Cos.

    A majority of the U.S. Supreme Court appeared unconvinced Monday that the Biden administration violated the First Amendment by working with social media platforms to combat the spread of misinformation, often chiding Louisiana's solicitor general for presenting confusing and overly expansive arguments.

  • March 18, 2024

    Feds, Tribes, Casinos Face Off Over Trust Land Request

    The Interior Department, Detroit-area casinos and two tribes are urging the D.C. Circuit to reject the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians' bid to compel the federal government to take land into trust for a casino venture several hundred miles away from its other trust lands on Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

  • March 18, 2024

    4th Circ. Preview: Airport Mishap, Inmate Pay Launch March

    The Fourth Circuit's spring session will task the court with refereeing a power struggle between Virginia regulators and the authority that runs Washington, D.C.'s airports — stemming from a workplace amputation — and delving into the "honest belief" doctrine's role in a Family Medical Leave Act case.

  • March 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Gov't Jawboning & Retaliatory Arrests

    The U.S. Supreme Court has a packed oral arguments calendar this week that includes disputes over the Biden administration's work with social media companies to combat misinformation, the appropriate evidence standard for bringing retaliatory arrest claims and whether the federal government can object to a consent decree entered into by three states.

  • March 15, 2024

    'This Is Scary, Boss': Jury Hears Secret Audio In LA RICO Trial

    A then-assistant to former Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar secretly recorded his boss as they discussed what to do with a $200,000 cash bribe amid an ongoing FBI probe, according to audio heard Friday by a federal jury considering racketeering and bribery charges against another former city official, Raymond Chan.

  • March 15, 2024

    Dems Want New Missile Plan Axed If Military Can't Justify Cost

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., suggested the Air Force's new nuclear missile program should be shuttered after it exceeded its expected cost to taxpayers by $36 billion, unless it can justify its relevance to national security.

  • March 15, 2024

    Ex-Prisoners Partially Settle Prepaid Card Suit For $2.8M

    Central National Bank NA and a class of former inmates who were charged fees for using the bank's prepaid debit cards from partner Numi Financial reached a $2.8 million settlement following mediation, but the parties have requested the court stay the case while class counsel investigates Numi's potential insolvency.

  • March 15, 2024

    Fla. Deal Might Let Illegal Gambling 'Proliferate,' Justices Told

    A coalition of South Florida gambling opponents are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a lower court's determination that a sports betting compact between the Sunshine State and the Seminole Tribe is lawful, arguing that their business and property interests will be negatively affected by the "unprecedented statewide gambling expansion."

  • March 15, 2024

    Navy Fails To Block Appeal Over Terminated HVAC Task Order

    A California construction contractor can go forward appealing the U.S. Navy's decision to terminate a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning task order after the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals shot down the Navy's contention the appeals board lacked jurisdiction.

  • March 15, 2024

    Pittsburgh NLRB Office Approves Security Co.'s ULP Deal

    A security company will pay more than $286,000 to workers to settle an unfair labor practice charge, the National Labor Relations Board announced Friday, with the NLRB general counsel winning a lost bargaining opportunity remedy.

  • March 15, 2024

    Military Subcontractor Says Partner Tried To Poach Work

    A federal subcontractor tasked with building secure facilities for the Marine Corps hit its own subcontractor with a $7 million lawsuit on Friday, accusing its former partner of deliberately undermining that construction work, in an effort to "steal" related contracts.

  • March 15, 2024

    Contractor's Single Claim For 2 Lost Trucks Enough, For Now

    A contractor didn't need to separate the value of two trucks lost by the U.S. Army to get the military to pay for replacement vehicles, an appeals board said, rejecting the Army's arguments that the contractor should have filed two claims.

  • March 15, 2024

    Fla. Tribe Urges No Pause In Suit Over State's Water Power

    The Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida on Thursday urged a federal judge not to pause its lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that alleges the state was improperly awarded authority over a Clean Water Act permitting program.

  • March 15, 2024

    Cannabis Sellers Want $6M Fees Refunded From Mass. Town

    A group of cannabis retailers are suing Great Barrington, Massachusetts, saying the town has illegally collected nearly $6 million in community impact fees, despite admitting in writing that the companies have caused virtually no costs to the town.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ex-LA Official Lied To Feds Immediately In Interview, Jury Told

    An FBI agent told a California federal jury on Thursday in former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan's federal bribery trial that Chan lied to him during a 2018 interview immediately after he was warned that lying to the bureau is a crime.

  • March 14, 2024

    3D-Gun Info Group Loses Suit Over Publishing Blueprints

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims tossed an open-source gun group's lawsuit alleging the federal government failed to follow a 2018 settlement allowing the group to publish firearm blueprints, rejecting the group's contention that dismissing a final claim would be unfair.

  • March 14, 2024

    Lawmakers Secure $1.3B For Native American Housing

    A record $1.34 billion will go toward Native American housing programs as part of an appropriations package passed by Congress, a $324 million increase over last year's funding.

  • March 14, 2024

    Feds Say Healthcare Ruling Could Upset Tribal Relationships

    The federal government is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower court's ruling that ordered Indian Health Services to reimburse millions in administrative healthcare costs, saying if the two tribes prevail in the litigation, it would upend 35 years of practice between the agency and its contracting tribes.

  • March 14, 2024

    Axon, Cities Fight Over Producing Material From FTC Case

    Axon Enterprise is sparring with municipalities accusing the police equipment maker of monopolizing the Taser and body camera markets, with the local governments pushing for what Axon described as the "premature and improper" production of discovery from the Federal Trade Commission's since-abandoned case.

  • March 14, 2024

    DOD Contractors Raise Double Jeopardy Issues With Retrial

    Two defense contractors asked a New Mexico federal court to bar prosecutors' evidence purportedly relating to a charge of conspiring to win small business contracts, saying the evidence actually relates to fraud charges for which they were already acquitted.

  • March 14, 2024

    Backers Of Colo. Wolf Release Can Defend State's Plan

    Defenders of Wildlife and other conservation groups can participate in a lawsuit seeking to block the further reintroduction of gray wolves into the state of Colorado, after a federal judge on Thursday said the groups have different interests from government agencies defending decisions related to the plan.

  • March 14, 2024

    Mass. High Court Says Tufts Win In Tenure Case 'Premature'

    Tenured professors at Tufts University whose salaries were slashed under a newly enacted requirement that they bring in at least half their income through research grants will have another chance to prove those pay cuts undermine academic freedom, Massachusetts' highest court said Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Bechtel Missed Subcontractor Targets On Nuke Waste Project

    Bechtel National Inc. failed its subcontracting obligations while building a federal nuclear waste plant at the Hanford site in Washington state, lapses that cost businesses up to $700 million in missed opportunities, according to a watchdog agency report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Energy Dept. Floats $2.26B Loan For Nev. Lithium Project

    The Biden administration is pitching a $2.26 billion loan to help fund lithium carbonate processing facilities at the controversial Thacker Pass mine in northern Nevada, saying they could support the production of as many as 800,000 electric vehicles a year.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • What May Define Contract Disputes Act Jurisdiction In 2024

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    Now is a good time to reflect on how several recent decisions may have limited the government's ability to weaponize jurisdictional prerequisites under the Contract Disputes Act, and how this new direction may affect government contractors and practitioners filing CDA appeals in 2024, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • The Space Law And Policy Outlook For 2024

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    Expect significant movement in space law, regulation and policy in 2024, as Congress, the administration and independent federal agencies like the Federal Communications Commission address the increasingly congested, contested and competitive nature of space and the space industry, say Paul Stimers and Leighton Brown at Holland & Knight.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Inside Higher Education's New FCA Liability Challenges

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    As the educational sector expands its use of government funding, schools are at increased risk under the False Claims Act, but recent settlements offer valuable lessons about new theories of liability they may face and specific procedures to reduce their exposure, say James Zelenay and Jeremy Ochsenbein at Gibson Dunn.

  • HHS Advisory Highlights Free Product Inducement Risks

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    A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advisory opinion highlights concerns that valuable free products and other inducements may influence patients and providers to choose one manufacturer’s product over another, notwithstanding that such free healthcare products may be a benefit, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • Bribery Bill Fills Gap In Foreign Corruption Enforcement

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    Congress recently passed the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act, significantly expanding the U.S. government's ability to prosecute foreign officials who seek or demand bribes, but if enacted, the legislation could also create tension with other nations, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray and Mayer Brown.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Gifts That May Run Afoul Of Government Ethics Rules

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    As the holiday season ramps up, it’s essential to keep in mind that government officials and employees are all subject to specific gift rules, and related violations can lead to consequences far worse than coal in one’s stocking, say Mark Renaud and Rob Walker at Wiley.

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