Public Policy

  • April 18, 2024

    Texas Says Justices' Takings Decision Saves Its Arrest Law

    Texas has pointed the Fifth Circuit to a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, arguing that it supports the state's bid to undo a district court injunction blocking state officials from arresting and deporting immigrants suspected of crossing the border unlawfully.

  • April 18, 2024

    Senate Bill Would Extend Small Biz Ch. 11 Debt Cap Increase

    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators are pushing new legislation that would prevent the current $7.5 million debt eligibility cap for Subchapter V bankruptcies, a simplified Chapter 11 process for small businesses and individuals, from reverting to the previous limit of $2.7 million in June.

  • April 18, 2024

    Google Judge Notes Broad Reach Of Texas Ad Tech Claims

    A Texas federal judge pressed Google during oral arguments Thursday to explain why a coalition of state attorneys general can't sue over its dominance in advertising placement auction technology when they're representing not just companies suing separately, but consumers as well.

  • April 18, 2024

    DOJ Tries To Quell Lawmakers' Concerns On FISA Bill

    The U.S. Department of Justice is looking to allay privacy concerns on Capitol Hill raised over the proposed reauthorization of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, telling Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., and others in recent letters that domestic churches and media companies can't be targeted under a controversial amendment.

  • April 18, 2024

    Nuke Power Plant Owner Says NY Can't Bar Water Discharges

    The owner of the shuttered Indian Point nuclear power plant sued the state of New York on Thursday, alleging a law banning discharges of radioactive materials into the Hudson River unlawfully infringes on the federal government's authority. 

  • April 18, 2024

    School, Library Supporters Call FCC Wi-Fi Plan Cost Effective

    A trio of school and library groups defended a Federal Communications Commission plan to fund Wi-Fi hot spots in education, saying the conservative Heritage Foundation mischaracterized the initiative as wasteful.

  • April 18, 2024

    AT&T, Pittsburgh Settle Dispute Over Cell Site Fees, Delays

    The city of Pittsburgh has created a new fee schedule for small wireless communications facilities, which AT&T agreed will resolve the telecom firm's claims that the city effectively prevented its service expansion with its prior fee schedule, according to a joint stipulation filed in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    T-Mobile, Others Rip 'Hodgepodge' Forced Store Closings Suit

    T-Mobile says it doesn't belong in a suit accusing it and another company of misleading store owners by promising it would open hundreds of new stores in the wake of its $26 billion merger with Sprint in 2020 only to turn around and shut the plaintiffs down.

  • April 18, 2024

    Texas Can't Stop Income Program Meant To Help The Poor

    A Houston judge on Thursday allowed a Harris County guaranteed income program to move forward, shutting down a bid from the Lone Star State to block the program less than a week before residents are scheduled to begin receiving payments.

  • April 18, 2024

    New Va. Law Prohibits NCAA From Limiting Athlete NIL Deals

    Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin on Thursday signed into law a landmark state bill that allows schools in the state to enter into name, image and likeness deals with athletes while prohibiting the NCAA and other institutions from punishing the athletes or the schools for cutting the NIL agreements.

  • April 18, 2024

    Missouri AG Launches Probe Into Delta-8 Products

    Missouri's Republican attorney general has launched an investigation into four companies purportedly manufacturing or selling vapes and other products containing hemp and marijuana derivatives such as CBD, delta-8 THC and delta-9 THC.

  • April 18, 2024

    BLM Prioritizes Conservation On Federal Land In Final Rule

    The Biden administration finalized a rule Thursday that prioritizes the conservation of federal lands through new initiatives like leasing frameworks that center on restoration and mitigation.

  • April 18, 2024

    Commerce Chided For Not Explaining Itself In Catfish Cases

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has kicked the final decision in a 2019 review of catfish duties back to the U.S. Department of Commerce, saying the agency flubbed basic administrative law by failing to "show its work" amid crisscrossing claims.

  • April 18, 2024

    FCC Probing Causes Of 911 Outage Across Four States

    The Federal Communications Commission said Thursday it will investigate what caused widespread 911 outages in Nevada, Texas, South Dakota and Nebraska.

  • April 18, 2024

    Trump Again Seeks Delay In Fla., Says Attys Tied Up In NY

    Counsel for Donald Trump in the ex-president's federal classified documents case in Florida again asked on Thursday to extend disclosure deadlines, contending that their client would be prejudiced without more time while some of them defend Trump in his hush money case in New York.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ga. Corp., Personal Income Tax Rates Dropping To 5.39%

    Domestic and foreign companies doing business in Georgia will continue to pay the same tax rate as individuals, but both corporate and personal rates will fall, according to a tax package signed Thursday by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp.

  • April 18, 2024

    Kimmel Atty Defends Airing 'Patently Ridiculous' Santos Clips

    A lawyer for Jimmy Kimmel told a Manhattan federal judge Thursday that the fair use doctrine of U.S. copyright law allows the late-night host to air silly videos that he tricked indicted former congressman George Santos into making on the personalized messaging platform Cameo.  

  • April 18, 2024

    Feds Say Ga. On The Hook For Segregated Learning Programs

    Attorneys for the U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday urged a federal court to advance to trial a nearly 8-year-old lawsuit that accused the state of Georgia of running a "separate and unequal" program that segregates thousands of students with disabilities into substandard learning conditions.

  • April 18, 2024

    FERC To Reveal Final Grid-Planning Policy Revamp

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday said it would unveil on May 13 the final version of its long-awaited overhaul of how major electric transmission projects are planned and paid for.

  • April 18, 2024

    Sugar Co. Urges 11th Circ. To Revive Helms-Burton Suit

    North American Sugar Industries Inc. asked the Eleventh Circuit Thursday to revive its suit accusing several companies that shipped wind turbines to Cuba of violating the Helms-Burton Act, saying the trial court erred in tossing its claims for lack of jurisdiction.

  • April 18, 2024

    Bank Regulators Appeal Texas Judge's Halt Of New CRA Rules

    Federal regulators said Thursday that they are appealing a Texas federal judge's decision to block their rollout of new community lending rules amid a legal challenge from the banking industry.

  • April 18, 2024

    Red States Back Call To Overturn Nasdaq Diversity Rule

    Utah and 23 other Republican-led states have filed an amicus brief asking the full Fifth Circuit to vacate a Nasdaq board diversity rule and declare it unconstitutional, saying the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which approved the rule, is "affirmatively perpetuating" race-based discrimination instead of eliminating it.

  • April 18, 2024

    Trade Court Says Gov't Must Redo Mexican Tomato Probe

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to redo a decades-old investigation into Mexican tomatoes, saying officials couldn't update the probe with new information when they were called to resume the long-delayed review.

  • April 18, 2024

    Gulf Oil Terminal Sale Spurs Environmental Settlement Talks

    The recent sale of a Gulf Oil shoreline terminal in New Haven, Connecticut, is poised to advance settlement talks in an environmental lawsuit challenging the facility's preparedness for the alleged effects of global warming, according to a federal court hearing held Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Mich. AG Slams 'Lackluster' Disclosure Laws At Ethics Hearing

    Michigan's attorney general and secretary of state testified on Thursday in support of ethics and transparency bills they say will help to fight "a culture of corruption" in the state's capital days after a former House speaker was charged with misusing state funds.  

Expert Analysis

  • Blocked JetBlue-Spirit Deal Illustrates New Antitrust Approach

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent successful block of a merger between JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines demonstrates antitrust enforcers’ updated and disparate approach to out-of-market benefits versus out-of-market harms, say Lisa Rumin and Anthony Ferrara at McDermott.

  • At 'SEC Speaks,' A Focus On Rebuilding Trust Amid Criticism

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    At the Practising Law Institute's SEC Speaks conference last week, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission leadership highlighted efforts to rebuild and restore trust in the U.S. capital markets by addressing investor concerns through regulatory measures and enforcement actions, emphasizing the need for cooperation from market participants, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Fla. Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q1

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    Early 2024 developments that could have a notable impact on Florida's finance community include progress on a bill that would substantially revise the state Securities and Investor Protection Act, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's final rule capping late fees for larger credit card issuers, say Benjamin Weinberg and Megan Riley at Leon Cosgrove.

  • The Pros And Cons Of NIST's Proposed March-In Framework

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    Recent comments for and against the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s proposed guidance on march-in rights — which permit the government to seize federally funded patents — highlight how the framework may promote competition, but could also pose a risk to contractors and universities, say Nick Lee and Paul Ragusa at Baker Botts.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Opinion

    Federal MDL Rule Benefits From Public Comments

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    The new Federal Rule of Civil Procedure concerning multidistrict litigation that was approved this week by the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules incorporates ideas from public comments that will aid both plaintiffs and defense attorneys — and if ultimately adopted, the rule should promote efficient, merits-driven MDL case management, say Robert Johnston and Gary Feldon at Hollingsworth.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Opinion

    Aviation Watch: Not All Airline Mergers Hurt The Public

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's actions to block recent attempted airline mergers have been touted as serving the interests of the consumers — but given the realities of the deregulated air travel market, a tie-up like the one proposed between JetBlue and Spirit might have been a win for the public, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • The Merger Cases That Will Matter At ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    While the American Bar Association's Antitrust Spring Meeting this week will cover all types of competition law issues in the U.S. and abroad, expect the federal agencies' recent track record in merger enforcement to be a key area of focus on the official panels and in cocktail party chatter, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • How Banks Should Respond To Calif. AG's Overdraft Warning

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    Banks and credit unions should heed recent guidance from California’s attorney general, along with warnings by consumer regulators of all stripes, regarding unfair fee practices by properly disclosing their fees and practices, and ensuring the amounts charged mirror federal benchmarks, say Brett D. Watson and Madeline Suchard at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Calif. Verdict Showcases SEC's New 'Shadow Trading' Theory

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    Last week's insider trading verdict, delivered against biopharmaceutical executive Matthew Panuwat by a California federal jury, signals open season on a new area of regulatory enforcement enabled by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's shadow trading theory, say Perrie Weiner and Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Cos. Should Prepare For Foreign Data Transfer Regulations

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    A new regulatory regime designed to protect U.S. sensitive data from countries of concern may complicate an already intricate geopolitical landscape and affect even companies beyond the data industry, but with careful preparation, such companies can endeavor to minimize the effect on their business operations and ensure compliance, say David Plotinsky and Jiazhen Guo at Morgan Lewis.

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