Trials

  • April 05, 2024

    Jury Finds Pharma Exec 'Shadow Traded' With Inside Info

    A California federal jury found Friday that a former Medivation executive is liable for using inside information from his company when he purchased stock in rival pharmaceutical maker Incyte, in a novel civil "shadow trading" case brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • April 05, 2024

    Surgeon Denied Atty Fees After Erasure of $15M Sex Bias Win

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has denied attorney fees after undoing a $15 million verdict won by a surgeon who alleged that Thomas Jefferson University exhibited anti-male bias in investigating a medical resident's sexual assault claims against him, ruling a new trial was necessary.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs' Trial Moved Over Atty Schedule Woes

    A New Jersey federal judge has agreed to reschedule the trial of two former Cognizant Technology Solutions executives accused of authorizing a bribe to an Indian official, answering the call by a Gibbons PC counsel who has another high-profile white-collar trial on his schedule the same day his Cognizant case client was also set to go before a jury.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Foley & Lardner Exit Bid From SEC Suit

    A request by Foley & Lardner LLP attorneys to stop representing a Malta-based registered investment adviser in a $75 million suit by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is hanging in the balance after a North Carolina federal judge expressed concerns about their exit holding up the case.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Won't Recuse Herself From Doctor's NBA Fraud Trial

    A Manhattan federal judge has refused to step away from the case of a Seattle doctor accused of participating in a scheme to defraud the National Basketball Association's health plan, saying there was "no basis" for his bid to oust her after he took issue with the trial schedule and what he described as systemic barriers.

  • April 05, 2024

    Terraform And Founder Do Kwon Held Liable For Crypto Fraud

    A Manhattan federal jury quickly found bankrupt cryptocurrency startup Terraform Labs and its creator Do Kwon liable Friday for securities fraud, after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claimed they lied to investors about the company's stability and business prospects.

  • April 04, 2024

    SEC Points Jury To 'Coincidence' In Shadow Trading Trial

    A U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission attorney on Thursday cross-examined a former executive of pharmaceutical company Medivation about his alleged "shadow trading" in the stock of rival pharma company Incyte, pressing the executive repeatedly to assert that various facts and circumstances supporting the agency's position were merely "coincidence."

  • April 04, 2024

    Judge Punts 'Warning Shot' Condo Sale Bid In Giuliani Ch. 11

    A New York bankruptcy judge held off on deciding if Rudy Giuliani must sell his Florida condo Thursday, cautioning attorneys for the former New York City mayor that the official committee of unsecured creditors might take more extreme steps in the Chapter 11 case if its concerns over Giuliani's expenses aren't addressed.

  • April 04, 2024

    Jury Clears Exec From Penalties In Captive Insurance Case

    An insurance executive and three of his companies won't face tax penalties for promoting an illegitimate insurance arrangement, a Florida federal jury ruled Thursday.

  • April 04, 2024

    'Halfhearted' Hytera Filings Not Enough To Lift Hefty Sanctions

    Hytera Communications' daily $1 million fine and other sanctions for violating an Illinois federal judge's anti-suit injunction stayed in place Thursday as she ordered the company to submit a fourth, more "meaningful" request in China to halt a lawsuit it lodged against Motorola Solutions.

  • April 04, 2024

    Young Thug Can't DQ Prosecutor Over Questions To Witness

    An Atlanta judge on Thursday denied a motion to disqualify the lead prosecutor in the racketeering trial against rapper Young Thug and five others after weighing claims that she had made herself a witness, according to defense counsel.

  • April 04, 2024

    John Eastman Says Inactive Status Hampers Livelihood

    Former Donald Trump attorney John Eastman asked the State Bar Court of California on Wednesday to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he can't sustain the loss of his livelihood representing clients like Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • April 04, 2024

    NC Tax Fraud Trial Evidence Bids Get Lukewarm Reception

    A North Carolina federal judge on Thursday seemed reluctant to limit certain evidence against two attorneys and an insurance agent in their upcoming tax fraud trial, saying some of it seemed pertinent to the government's quest to prove intent but suspected other information might be construed by jurors as "petty."

  • April 04, 2024

    Huawei Slated For 2026 Sanctions, IP Theft Trial

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Thursday set the trial of China's Huawei Technologies and affiliates for 2026, over prosecutors' claims that Huawei deceived banks and the U.S. government for years about its business dealings in sanctioned countries and conspired to steal intellectual property from U.S. companies.

  • April 04, 2024

    $1.6M Med Mal Brain Injury Verdict Nixed Over Jury Instruction

    The Virginia Supreme Court on Thursday wiped out a $1.6 million verdict in a malpractice suit by a woman alleging she had a seizure and fell because her doctor didn't properly treat her low blood sodium, saying the trial court should have given the jury an instruction requested by the doctor.

  • April 04, 2024

    NY AG Wants Trump Insurer To Guarantee $175M Bond

    New York Attorney General Letitia James asked a Manhattan judge Thursday to make sure the California insurer that agreed to post Donald Trump's $175 million bond in his civil business fraud case can actually pay.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ex-NY Court Atty Found Guilty Of Official Misconduct

    A New York state jury on Thursday found a former appeals court attorney guilty of official misconduct for using her position to provide a legal opinion that helped her husband and his law firm secure a $55,000 payment from a new client.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ga. Says Listening to Atty-Client Calls Not Unconstitutional

    The state of Georgia has told the state's Supreme Court that prosecutors didn't trample on the Sixth Amendment rights of a man convicted of assault, because they didn't intentionally seek to listen to privileged phone calls between the man and his lawyer and because the phone calls weren't evidence at trial.

  • April 03, 2024

    2nd Circ. Told FIFA Bribery Convictions Rightly Nixed

    A former 21st Century Fox television executive and an Argentine sports marketing company told the Second Circuit that a lower court was right to toss their convictions related to the FIFA corruption scandal, contending that U.S. law does not reach foreign commercial bribery.

  • April 03, 2024

    Accused 'Shadow Trader' Takes Stand To Slam SEC's Case

    A former Medivation executive accused of "shadow trading" when he purchased stock in rival Incyte testified in his California federal civil trial Wednesday that he didn't base that decision on confidential information, and he didn't think even "for one second" that he was violating securities laws.

  • April 03, 2024

    Apple Blasts Input From Microsoft, Meta, Others In Epic Case

    Apple asked a California federal judge Wednesday to reject attempts by Microsoft, Meta Platforms, Spotify and other major developers to insert themselves into Epic Games' argument that the iPhone maker is not complying with an order barring it from using anti-steering rules in the App Store.

  • April 03, 2024

    Police Had It Wrong In Reports On Migrant's Death, Jury Told

    An Arizona jury weighing charges that a rancher killed a migrant who was found dead on his property heard Wednesday from the rancher's wife, who was pressed on a discrepancy between officers' reports of how many people she had seen outside that day and her own memory.

  • April 03, 2024

    Winning Foreign Patent Damages Just Became A Lighter Lift

    The Federal Circuit has clarified that patent owners can ask for reasonable royalties when pursuing damages for foreign infringement and expanded what constitutes eligible infringement in those instances, a ruling attorneys say should make it easier to recover damages from abroad.

  • April 03, 2024

    Netflix Libel Trial To Feature Full Central Park 5 Series

    Jurors will watch Netflix's entire four-part dramatization of the Central Park Five rape case and exoneration before deciding whether the series defamed a longtime top prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday ahead of the trial.

  • April 03, 2024

    VLSI's Bid To Undo Intel Patent Win Is Scrutinized On Appeal

    A Federal Circuit panel on Wednesday questioned VLSI's position that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board wrongly found claims of its computer memory patent invalid in a challenge by Intel, suggesting that a previous ruling may have foreclosed VLSI's argument.

Expert Analysis

  • Zero-Point Offender Eligibility May Hinge On Meaning Of 'And'

    Author Photo

    Some white collar defendants’ eligibility for the new zero-point offender sentencing adjustment comes down to whether the word “and” really means “and” — a question the U.S. Supreme Court is set to resolve in its upcoming Pulsifer v. U.S. decision, which could affect thousands of incarcerated people, say Brandon McCarthy and Nikita Yogeshwarun at Katten.

  • Complying With Enforcers' Ephemeral Messaging Guidance

    Author Photo

    Given federal antitrust enforcers’ recently issued guidance on ephemeral messaging applications, organizations must take a proactive approach to preserving short-lived communications — or risk criminal obstruction charges and civil discovery sanctions, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

    Author Photo

    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

    Author Photo

    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

    Author Photo

    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

    Author Photo

    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Perspectives

    Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

    Author Photo

    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

    Author Photo

    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

    Author Photo

    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

    Author Photo

    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Trials archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!