Trials

  • April 03, 2024

    Ethiopian Air Trial Set For November Over Boeing's Objections

    An Illinois federal judge said Wednesday that some pending lawsuits over a 2019 Ethiopian Airlines crash will go to trial late this year, despite Boeing's objections that he should hold off on setting a trial date to allow for fruitful settlement negotiations.

  • April 03, 2024

    1st Circ. Hints Trader Joe's Age Bias Case Fit For Jury

    A pair of First Circuit judges on Wednesday suggested that an 80-year-old former Trader Joe's employee should have gotten the chance to bring her age discrimination claims to trial after she was fired for buying beer for her underage grandson.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ex-NBA Guard's Health Fraud Perjury Merits Prison, Feds Say

    Manhattan federal prosecutors said a former Detroit Pistons point guard who was convicted on one of two counts over an alleged scheme to defraud the NBA's healthcare plan should be sentenced to 27 to 33 months in prison, claiming he lied during his testimony.

  • April 03, 2024

    Special Counsel Tells Judge Cannon To Rule On PRA Issue

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate told U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon that she needs to rule on Trump's argument that he was authorized under the Presidential Records Act to take the documents and cannot send the question of law to the jury.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Denies He Blew Whistle To Deflect Scandal

    Autonomy's former U.S. chief financial officer denied under cross-examination Tuesday in the California criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch that he brought whistleblower concerns about alleged accounting irregularities to the software company's Deloitte auditors to "cover" himself after a payroll scandal emerged in his department.

  • April 02, 2024

    Trump Wants New Bite At Recusal Over Judge's Daughter

    Donald Trump is again seeking the recusal of the judge overseeing his Manhattan criminal case, saying the judge's daughter and her political consulting firm stand to financially benefit from the case, while prosecutors argued Trump's "daisy chain of innuendos" isn't evidence that the judge, or his daughter, will gain anything.

  • April 02, 2024

    Gas Tycoon Owes $100M To UBS, Lenders After Trial Loss

    Energy titan Charif Souki owes more than $100 million to lenders, including a fund managed by a UBS division, a U.S. bankruptcy judge has ruled, rejecting Souki's claims that his lenders recklessly sold off collateral posted for the loan, including a luxury yacht, a Colorado ranch and shares of his liquefied natural gas export business Tellurian Inc.

  • April 02, 2024

    9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Theranos Execs' Criminal Appeals In June

    The Ninth Circuit has set oral arguments in former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' high-stakes appeal of her criminal securities fraud conviction and 11-year prison sentence for June 11 — the same day the panel is scheduled to hear arguments in convicted ex-Theranos executive Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani's appeal.

  • April 02, 2024

    3 Sentenced To Prison In Fla. Fake Nursing Diploma Case

    A Florida judge sentenced three people to federal prison time Tuesday after they were convicted for their roles in a multimillion-dollar fake nursing diploma scheme following a jury trial in December

  • April 02, 2024

    'Road Not Taken': Uber Defends Verdict With Poetic Flair

    Making reference to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday said a group of UberBlack drivers chose their road when they urged a Pennsylvania federal court to consider less than a unanimous verdict, and could not turn back around when the jurors leaned toward declaring them independent contractors.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-NY Court Atty Says DA Has No Evidence Of Corruption

    A former appeals court attorney told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that the district attorney can't back up charges that she intended to benefit her husband when she gave a "basic, procedural fact" about the status of a case to his client.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek Use Of 'Intertwined' Evidence In NC Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors have asked a North Carolina district court to permit tangential evidence in a tax fraud trial, saying that the evidence is "inextricably intertwined with the charged conduct" of two St. Louis attorneys and a North Carolina insurance agent.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

  • April 02, 2024

    Prosecutors Call Indicted Exec's Misconduct Claims 'Flawed'

    Prosecutors have asked a California federal judge to reject a bid for sanctions by a former healthcare CEO indicted on novel insider trading charges, arguing that his claims related to a separate case are based on "flawed grounds."

  • April 02, 2024

    Boston Bomber Case Offers Clues For Trump Jury Selection

    A recent ruling that may undo the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence holds lessons for Donald Trump's upcoming trials, where attorneys will need to make prospective jurors comfortable enough to admit bias before they're picked — and potentially avoid years of appellate fights.

  • April 01, 2024

    Trump Posts $175M Bond, Pausing $465M Fraud Judgment

    Donald Trump on Monday posted a $175 million bond, ducking, for now, enforcement of a nearly $465 million civil fraud judgment against him and his businesses in the New York attorney general's case accusing them of defrauding banks and insurers.

  • April 01, 2024

    Autonomy Paid Whistleblower $750K Over Firing, Jury Told

    Autonomy's former U.S. chief financial officer testified Monday in the California criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch that he was fired after blowing the whistle to British regulators about accounting irregularities, and revealed that Autonomy later paid him $750,000 to resolve his wrongful termination claims.

  • April 01, 2024

    Trump's Gag Order Expands Over 'Attacks' On Judge's Family

    Donald Trump has a constitutional right to respond to alleged political attacks, but he does not have a right to attack family members of the state judge overseeing his criminal case in New York, the judge ruled late Monday, expanding the former president's gag order in his hush money case.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Off The Bench

    A three-member panel of Georgia's Judicial Qualifications Commission has recommended a Douglas County probate judge be removed from the bench following accusations that she violated the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailed a woman seeking to amend her marriage record.

  • April 01, 2024

    Dish Tells Jury It's Getting Squeezed For Millions In Extra Rent

    Dish Wireless told a Denver jury Monday that one of the nation's largest telecommunications infrastructure companies is trying to change a 30-year deal and get "hundreds of millions" of dollars in extra rent for storing equipment at cell tower sites because it knew Dish had no other option.

  • April 01, 2024

    Mixed Ruling Readies Vegas Newspapers For Trial

    A Nevada federal judge has teed up the Las Vegas Review-Journal and the Las Vegas Sun for a contentious trial with a decision nixing Review-Journal antitrust counterclaims, preserving core Sun antitrust claims and holding the Review-Journal to an agreement to distribute the papers as a single product.

  • April 01, 2024

    Nat'l Security Info Ordered Sealed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has ordered protocols to seal confidential State Department materials amid the government's criminal fraud case charging a Maryland lawyer with misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets.

  • April 01, 2024

    Milliman Lost 401(k) Funds On Unproven Strategy, Judge Told

    Milliman's risky investments cost its employees' retirement plan more than $50 million and were part of a failed "experiment" to benefit its own bottom line, a class of employees told a Washington federal judge on Monday, kicking off a bench trial seeking to recover their losses.

  • April 01, 2024

    Pool Co. Seeks $4.36M In Atty Fees After False Ad Verdict

    Attorneys from McCarter & English LLP and Womble Bond Dickinson LLP are seeking more than $4 million in fees following a multimillion-dollar verdict in a North Carolina false advertising and unfair business practices suit involving rival pool supply companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Feds Back Guilty Verdict After Software Execs' Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors on Monday defended a jury verdict finding two former software executives in North Carolina guilty of failing to pay employment taxes, saying sufficient evidence supported their convictions.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

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