Trials

  • March 27, 2024

    Ex-SDNY Clerk Can't Skirt Prison For Bribe Plot, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York pushed back on a former court clerk's request for no prison time after he was convicted of scheming to refer clients to a defense attorney for kickbacks, calling for a sentence of 41 to 51 months.

  • March 27, 2024

    Terraform Loses Mistrial Bid After Rakoff Query About 'Lying'

    Manhattan U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff on Wednesday rejected a mistrial bid by counsel for Terraform Labs and creator Do Kwon centering on the judge's move to ask an investor if the bankrupt crypto startup had disclosed potential risks about "lying" to the public.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-LA Deputy Mayor's Fate In Bribery Trial Goes To Calif. Jury

    Former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan connected corrupt public officials to wealthy developers for years as part of the "CD-14 Enterprise" racketeering conspiracy, a federal prosecutor told California federal jurors in closing arguments Tuesday, saying their shared goal was ensuring they "get money, keep power and avoid the Feds."

  • March 26, 2024

    Banker Describes Confidential Work In 'Shadow Trading' Trial

    An Evercore investment banker who worked on Medivation's 2016 sale to Pfizer testified Tuesday in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's novel "shadow trading" trial, saying the defendant was involved in a confidential process that identified biopharma company Incyte as comparable to Medivation — information the defendant is accused of trading on.

  • March 26, 2024

    Sedgwick Judge Rips Attys 'Playing Games' In Clawback Trial

    A California federal judge presiding over the Sedgwick LLP trustee's bid to claw back $1.1 million from two ex-partners overruled defense objections to Sedgwick's financial statements, asking, "How am I supposed to do this without numbers?" and telling counsel, "You're playing games with me on this, because I need to see numbers."

  • March 26, 2024

    Pharmacy Owner Gets 42 Months For $25M Kickback Scam

    A medical equipment pharmacy owner was sentenced to 42 months in prison Tuesday for carrying out a $25 million kickback scheme with a patient-leads broker as part of a scheme to falsely bill the federal government for care.

  • March 26, 2024

    Terraform Backer Tells Jury His Firm Lost Big On $36M Stake

    A Boston venture capitalist told the Manhattan federal jury hearing fraud claims against Terraform Labs and its creator Do Kwon on Tuesday that his former company confidently invested $35.9 million in the crypto startup based on representations that regulators say were false.

  • March 26, 2024

    Insurance Mogul's Ex-Political Consultant Wants Own Retrial

    A former political consultant charged alongside embattled insurance mogul Greg Lindberg wants their criminal retrial on wire fraud and bribery charges severed, telling a federal court that Lindberg's potential plan to throw him under the bus will destroy any defenses against the government's accusations.

  • March 26, 2024

    Opioid Public Nuisance Claims 'Unique,' Ohio High Court Told

    Counsel for two Ohio counties that won a $650 million verdict against Walmart, CVS and Walgreens told the Ohio Supreme Court on Tuesday that opioids are a "unique" problem during oral arguments about whether the counties' public nuisance claims are blocked by the state's product liability law.

  • March 26, 2024

    Widow Gets $1.75M Verdict In SC Asbestos Death Suit

    A South Carolina jury has awarded a widow $1.75 million in damages from gasket-maker John Crane Inc. in a suit over her husband's death from asbestos-related mesothelioma, finding the company negligent.

  • March 26, 2024

    NC Software Execs Ask To Raze Payroll Tax Fraud Conviction

    Two former software executives found guilty of failing to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in employment taxes have sought to wipe out their conviction based on what they allege was insufficient evidence presented by the government at trial.

  • March 26, 2024

    Trump Hit With Gag Order In NY Criminal Trial After Threats

    The New York judge overseeing Donald Trump's hush money case on Tuesday imposed a limited gag order on the former president, barring him from speaking publicly about jurors or witnesses and limiting what he can say about any attorneys in the case, prosecutors, court staff or their families.

  • March 26, 2024

    Girardi Fraud Trial Moved To Aug. 6

    A California federal judge has agreed to postpone disgraced California plaintiffs attorney Tom Girardi's trial to Aug. 6, setting the proceedings to begin 16 months later than originally required at the outset of the case.

  • March 26, 2024

    Menendez Says Corruption Case Still Wrongly Placed In NY

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez has told a Manhattan federal judge that prosecutors' latest iteration of his corruption indictment doesn't resolve legal deficiencies that plagued previous ones, including a flimsy connection to the Southern District of New York.

  • March 26, 2024

    REIT Exec Tells 2nd Circ. To Toss $3.2M Judgment

    The co-founder of a real estate investment trust told the Second Circuit to toss the $3.2 million judgment awarded in a former partner's 2014 suit, arguing that related jury instructions were "too confusing and prejudicial."

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-Veterans Home Leaders Resolve Landmark COVID-19 Case

    The former leaders of a Massachusetts veterans facility charged in the first pandemic-related criminal neglect case against a nursing home operator resolved the charges Tuesday with separate statements of admission, acknowledging they could be found guilty if they stood trial.

  • March 25, 2024

    SEC Kicks Off 'Shadow Trading' Case Against Drug Exec

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said at the start of a California federal "shadow trading" trial that a former Medivation executive made $120,000 by buying stock in a rival after learning his company would be acquired by Pfizer, while the defense said he didn't believe the trades violated securities law.

  • March 25, 2024

    In High Court Sentencing Case, It's Everyone V. Gibson Dunn

    As the U.S. Supreme Court scrutinizes severe sentencing of repeat offenders, one view is backed by the Biden administration, defense bar groups, incarceration reformers and a household name among appellate advocates. And then there's the view backed by a few lawyers at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • March 25, 2024

    Calif. Judge Sick Of VLSI, Intel Filing Without Permission

    A California federal judge has chastised VLSI and Intel for overflowing the court with endless "repetitive and unhelpful" briefs, which they were never authorized to file.

  • March 25, 2024

    Ex-LA Official Downplayed Role In Huizar Bribes, Jury Told

    An FBI agent told California federal jurors in former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan's criminal trial Monday that Chan denied facilitating bribes between then-city councilor Jose Huizar and a developer when initially questioned by investigators, despite evidence showing he helped orchestrate Las Vegas trips and loans to help Huizar.

  • March 25, 2024

    Judge Finalizes Ban On Taking $540M IP Fight To China

    An Illinois federal judge granted Motorola's request to stop Hytera from pursuing a non-infringement case against it in China, saying Monday that she would also start contempt proceedings in the case.

  • March 25, 2024

    Backstabbing 'Just How Law Firms Work': Sedgwick Judge

    A California federal judge told counsel during bench trial openings Monday that the Sedgwick LLP trustee's bid to claw back $1.1 million from two ex-partners isn't a "blame game," and "partners stab each other in the back every day and move on to the next one" — "it's just how law firms work."

  • March 25, 2024

    'Blade Server' Patent Co. Scores $18M Waco Verdict

    A patent litigation outfit that has been filing suits for more than a decade over "blade server" technology has landed nearly $18 million from a jury in Waco, Texas, against a Taiwanese computer manufacturer that tried to refute the technology's importance by relying on testimony from the inventor of the USB drive.

  • March 25, 2024

    What To Watch As Opioid Litigation Goes To Ohio High Court

    The Ohio Supreme Court on Tuesday will become only the second state high court to hear oral arguments on whether the opioid epidemic is a public nuisance, the controversial legal theory underpinning numerous suits across the country including a $650 million award that two Ohio counties won against Walmart, CVS and Walgreens.

  • March 25, 2024

    Jury Hands Mortgage Co. $73K Win In Trade Secrets Fight

    An Ohio federal jury has found that Revolution Mortgage owes just over $73,700 to competitor Equity Resources in a case where Equity accused its rival of misappropriation of trade secrets.

Expert Analysis

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Trials Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    Law360 guest columnists provided a number of tips and insights for trial attorneys this year, including pitfalls to avoid in witness preparation, color psychology pointers that can enhance trial graphics, and strategies for excluding expert testimony.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • NY Wrongful Death Law Revamp Retains Original's Drawbacks

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    If approved by New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, the Grieving Families Act will transform the landscape of wrongful death law in New York by increasing the potential for damages, raising insurance premiums, burdening hospitals and courts, stifling the economy and subjecting parties to the unsettling effects of retroactive legislation, say attorneys at Shaub Ahmuty.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Trends To Watch In Property And Casualty Class Actions

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    In 2023, class action decisions have altered the landscape for five major types of claims affecting property and casualty insurers — total loss vehicle valuation, labor depreciation, other structural loss estimating theories, total loss vehicle tax and regulatory fees, and New Mexico's uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage sale requirements, say Mark Johnson and Mathew Drocton at BakerHostetler.

  • 3 Defense Takeaways From The Bankman-Fried Trial

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    FTX founder and former CEO Sam Bankman-Fried’s recent fraud conviction offers several key lessons for future white collar defendants, from the changing nature of cross-examination to the continued risks of taking the stand, say Jonathan Porter and Gregg Sofer at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • A Review Of 2023's Most Notable Securities Litigation

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    There is much to be learned from the most prominent private securities cases of 2023, specifically the Tesla trial, the U.S. Supreme Court's Slack decision and the resolution of Goldman Sachs litigation, but one lesson running through all of them is that there can be rewards at the end of the line for defendants willing to go the distance, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • SDNY Ruling Warns Parties To Heed Amended Disclosure Rule

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    A Manhattan federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Mrabet forewarns both prosecutors and defense counsel that amended expert witness disclosure obligations will be rigorously enforced by judges, and gives some insight into how courts may deal with related constitutional challenges, say John Siffert and Brandon Davis at Lankler Siffert.

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